Vita Gazette

News from Italy

The News: Short weekly world tour

Vita gazette – From the USA to NATO and the EU, from Russia to China and the Pacific… From energy to arms and hunger… From culture to history and art… From natural disasters to new discoveries and technology… Important history recorded notes… (August 15-22, 2022)

Human and animal rights

Norway: A 600-kilogram walrus named Freya, who boarded boats to sunbathe, was put to sleep by authorities on the grounds that it endangered people’s lives and was killed. (August 15)

Saudi Arabia: Ph.D. student Salma al-Shehab was sentenced to 34 years in prison for using a website to “create public turmoil and destabilize civil and national security” by having a Twitter account, following and posting with dissidents and activists. (August 17)

Russia – Daria Dugina, the daughter of Russian political scientist Alexander Dugin, whose opinion President Vladimir Putin also sought, died tragically when the car she was driving on a highway near Moscow suddenly exploded. The car he drove belonged to his father.

FSB: Ukrainian intelligence

The Russian Federal Security Service (FSB) announced that the assassination of Daria Dugina, the daughter of famous Russian political expert Aleksandr Dugin, was carried out by Ukrainian intelligence Natalya Vovk.

The FSB Public Relations Center said in a statement, “As a result of urgent operational-reconnaissance activities, the assassination of Russian journalist Daria Dugina was clarified by the FSB. It was determined that the crime was prepared and committed by the Ukrainian intelligence, and that the perpetrator was Natalya Vovk, a Ukrainian citizen born in 1979.”

Noting that Vovk came to Russia with his daughter Sofia, born in 2010, on July 23, 2022, and went to the “Traditsiya literature and music festival” where Dugina was the guest of honor on the day of the assassination, the FSB said, “Toyota Land Cruiser Prado brand Dugina is behind the wheel. “After the vehicle was detonated by remote control, Vovk traveled with his daughter to Estonia via the Pskov Region on August 21.” (August 21-22)

Global warming – Climate change – Natural disasters

France: After the heat wave that has been effective across the country recently, heavy rain and storm hit the capital Paris. While some streets and streets in the capital turned into the lake, metro stations were flooded. It was seen that the roofs of some buildings were blown off due to the storm. (August 17)

New Zealand: A state of emergency has been declared in the country due to flooding following heavy rains. 200 homes were evacuated in the flood-affected areas. (August 17)

Germany: The drought in Europe has led to the reappearance of “hunger rocks” in the rivers of Germany, on which people carved writings to remind them of drought and hunger years ago. (August 17)

Bosnia and Herzegovina: The drought also affected Bosnia and Herzegovina. It has been reported that the source of the Miljacka River is about to succumb to drought. (August 19)

Serbia: The Danube also succumbed to drought. Dozens of German warships sunk during World War II have resurfaced on the Danube in eastern Serbia amid Europe’s worst drought in recent years. (August 19)

Azerbaijan: 5 thousand hectares of forests were destroyed in fires in the north of the country. (August 19)

China: Red alert for high temperatures continues. In some parts of the country, warnings were made that temperatures could exceed 40 degrees Celsius. (August 20)

India: 22 people died and 8 disappeared in the flood disaster in the country’s Himachal Pradesh state. (August 20)

England: In East Sussex County, beaches near the county were closed after untreated sewage was spilled into the sea by water companies. (August 20)

Spain: In Spain, where extreme temperatures are experienced, in the dam lake whose water was withdrawn due to drought, BC. Remains of the so-called Spanish Stonehenge, dating back thousands of years, have resurfaced. (August 20)

Health

Monkey Pox: The World Health Organization (WHO) stated that after two men living in the same house in France were diagnosed with monkeypox, the dog in the house was also infected with the monkeypox virus. (August 17)

Monkeypox: The World Health Organization (WHO) reported that the spread of the monkeypox epidemic has accelerated and the number of weekly cases has increased by 20 percent worldwide. WHO) Director General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus stated that the monkeypox virus was seen in 92 countries and the number of cases worldwide exceeded 35 thousand, and announced that 12 people died due to the virus. (August 18)

Covid-19: More than 5 million people will be tested for Covid-19 in the coastal city of Xiamen, China. Fish were also included in the scope of the test on the grounds that “some fishermen may engage in illegal trade while at sea and come into contact with ships from abroad”. (August 18)

Tomato flu: The increase in the “tomato flu” cases, which started to be seen in India in May, prompted the experts to take action. The virus, which has been detected in 82 children aged five to six so far, takes its name from the red blisters that appear on the skin of infected people. Symptoms include fever, fatigue, body aches, vomiting and diarrhea. (August 19)

Art – Culture – History

USA: The Academy has apologized 50 years later to Sacheen Littlefeather, who took the stage to convey Marlon Brando’s rejection of his Oscar for “The Godfather.” Francis Ford Coppola’s The Father also won the best picture award at the ceremonies that year. Littlefeather, who took the stage at Brando’s request in 1973, was the subject of boos and racist rhetoric. The Academy, which organized the Oscar awards ceremonies, apologized to Littlefeather and announced that it would hold a special event for Littlefeather at its museum.

Regarding the apology, Littlefeather said, “We locals are very patient people, I just had to wait 50 years! We always have to keep our sense of humor alive, that’s the way we survive.”

Littlefeather stated that actor John Wayne, who came on stage to attack him, was forcibly blocked and that the government prevented him from getting a job because he threatened to end any program in which he was involved. (August 16)

Belgium: Tchaikovsky School of Music, operating in the capital Brussels, announced that it will change its name and ban Russian music. Nataliya Chepurenko, in a statement on social media, announced that they will enter the new academic year with the name “Brussels International Academy of Music” instead of the name of Russian composer Tchaikovsky. Çepurenko stated that Russian music will no longer be played in the club and said that they will not play the works of Russian composers even at extracurricular events such as festivals, competitions and international projects. (August 17)

Syria: The “Marmarita Carnival” held in the country was the scene of colorful scenes. The carnival held in Homs, north of Damascus, attracted great attention. (August 17)

India: Nepal celebrates the Krishna Janmashtami festival, held to commemorate the birth anniversary of the Hindu God Krishna. (August 19)

International relations and strategies

Estonia: The Soviet monument in the country’s Russian-speaking border city was removed after Prime Minister Kaja Kallas said it poses a risk to public order. (August 16)

Finland: Decided to reduce the number of visas issued to Russian citizens by 90 percent. (August 17)

NATO-Serbia-Kosovo: NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg once again reiterated that “NATO is ready to intervene to maintain stability”, calling on Serbia and Kosovo not to escalate tensions. (August 17)

Russia: Global companies that announced their withdrawal from Russia due to the Russia and Ukraine War are being replaced by Russians. After Mc’Donald’s, a new one was opened to replace the famous coffee chain Starbucks. Having bought the rights of the US chain in Russia, rapper Timati and his friend Anton Pinsky started their activities in Russia under the name “Stars Coffe”. Their first job was to change the logo. Starbucks’ mermaid figure was replaced by a woman wearing the traditional Russian kokoshnik headdress. (August 19)

Russia – Daria Dugina, the daughter of Russian political scientist Alexander Dugin, who is called the ideologue of the Russian world and whom President Vladimir Putin consults, died in a sudden explosion as a result of the sudden explosion of his vehicle while driving on a highway near Moscow. The car she drove belonged to his father.

Aleksandr Dugin, along with his daughter Darya Dugina, who works as his assistant and press secretary, participated in the literary and music festival “Tradition”, which took place on Saturday in Zaharovo, near Moscow. According to the festival program, Dugin gave a lecture on “Tradition and History”. Alexandr Dugin was supposed to be in the vehicle on the way back, but at the last moment he decided to travel in another vehicle and left it to his daughter. An investigation has been launched into the death of Darya Dugina, daughter of Russia’s well-known political expert Aleksandr Dugin.

FSB: Ukrainian intelligence

The Russian Federal Security Service (FSB) announced that the assassination of Daria Dugina, the daughter of famous Russian political expert Aleksandr Dugin, was carried out by Ukrainian intelligence Natalya Vovk.

The FSB Public Relations Center said in a statement, “As a result of urgent operational-reconnaissance activities, the assassination of Russian journalist Daria Dugina was clarified by the FSB. It was determined that the crime was prepared and committed by the Ukrainian intelligence, and that the perpetrator was Natalya Vovk, a Ukrainian citizen born in 1979.”

Noting that Vovk came to Russia with his daughter Sofia, born in 2010, on July 23, 2022, and went to the “Traditsiya literature and music festival” where Dugina was the guest of honor on the day of the assassination, the FSB said, “Toyota Land Cruiser Prado brand Dugina is behind the wheel. “After the vehicle was detonated by remote control, Vovk traveled with his daughter to Estonia via the Pskov Region on August 21.” (August 21-22)

Russia – USA: Russia announced that more than 100 mercenary fighters were killed in Ukraine. It was noted that 20 of these fighters were US citizens. (August 20)

Energy: The prime minister of a state in Germany, when asked if he had taken a shower in an interview about the energy crisis, argued that he did better, saying, “You don’t have to take a shower all the time. After all, there is a washcloth, it’s a useful invention.” Switzerland: It was stated that the government should prepare for “extraordinary scenarios” regarding the energy shortage that is most likely to be experienced in the country from the winter season. The public was advised to stock up on candles and wood against power cuts. (August 20-21)

Politics – Elections

Montenegro: The government headed by Dritan Abazovic, who became the target of criticism by signing a fundamental agreement with the Serbian Orthodox Church, fell without a vote of confidence in the parliament. (August 20)

 

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